Wednesday, November 30, 2005

[TIPS] -webcollaborator.com

—---------------snip--------------
This website creates a new free and easy way to collaborate. Before Web Collaborator, to collaborate on a project meant passing papers back and forth, hours of painstaking corrections, hundreds of wasted pieces of paper, headaches, and plenty of coffee. Web Collaborator coordinates collaborations automatically, keeping backups of every revision ever made to the project, letting you see who made the changes, and allowing you to focus on the work instead of managing the work. Better yet, it is absolutely free for all uses.

http://webcollaborator.com/
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Tuesday, November 29, 2005

[TIPS] - online educational games

 
Free online games to learn the Periodic tables, or geography, vocabulary, or trivia. Looks like fun - and if you don't tell them, they just might learn something, too. :-)

Wednesday, November 23, 2005

[TIPS] - more physics applets

 
There are about four pages worth of small applets here that help to explain microwaves, or xrays, lasers, or TV screens, etc. Most allow you to control the variables to see the effects of that change.
 
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And, on a personal note, I do hope that you have a warm and loving Thanksgiving.

Tuesday, November 22, 2005

[TIPS] - Music site

Having been a music teacher in a former life I can appreciate this site. So will your music teacher friends.

http://www.teoria.com/reference/

Hear scales and chords, construct intervals, see mathmatical relationships, and much more. And, if you become a member for $20 you can actually download the entire site onto your computer.
 
Granted, you can't create your own music here, and you can't experiment much, but it's a nice site to have on hand.

Monday, November 21, 2005

[TIPS] - nrich Math site - with LINK

DOH!!! See how flustered that made me? No link!!! <sigh> Here it is...
 
 
From the site:
—-------------snip----------
Welcome to another edition of the NRICH website, where our mathematical theme is Probability. We hope that you will discover the power of this month's interactive environment to simulate many trials, therefore making the process of obtaining data more manageable.
—------------
Looks like it would be appropriate for middle to high school age students. The interface is a bit clunky (IMHO*) but the activities look very interesting - and fun.
 
(If anyone finds any "naughty numbers" - I .... I .... give up!)              :-)
 
 
* In My Humble Opinion
 

Friday, November 18, 2005

[TIPS] - Salariya Web Books

—-------snip----------------
Created by The Salariya Book Company, these innovative titles use a unique combination of information and humour to describe life in earlier times. Web users can interact with the characters by simply moving the cursor over them, to see their thoughts and comments as each story unfolds.

The four Web Books described below are based on titles in the "You Wouldn't Want To Be.." series, which is published in the UK as "Danger Zone".

--------------------------
Click the first link, "You Wouldn't Want to Be A Roman Gladiator...", then use the <Next> or <Previous> links on the sotry pages to follow them through. They really look like fun for the younger ones.
 
 

Thursday, November 17, 2005

[TIPS] - wiki ehow

From the site:
—-----------
What is eHow.com?
eHow.com is the world's most widely read how to manual. Every month over 4 million people visit eHow to learn how to do something. With hundreds of thousands of pages of advice, eHow offers staff-written, reviewed and edited step-by-step solutions. Every eHow is clear, concise, and accurate. So whether you are learning how to tie a tie, build a deck, kiss on a date, train your dog to heel, ollie on a skateboard, lose weight, negotiate a raise, or even throw a curveball - eHow can help you.
 
 http://wiki.ehow.com/Main-Page

—------------------
Even if you don't use the site to learn how to tie a tie, for example, perhaps it'll give you an idea of how YOU can use a wiki with your classes. If you decide that you'd like to learn more about them, watch for an announcement coming soon regarding a class on Moodle. It contains a wiki - or multiple wikis, if you want more. Then, coming as early as December watch for another anouncement regarding a class just in wikis alone. (We'll be installing a wiki server if we get our grant.)

Wednesday, November 16, 2005

[TIPS] - whyquit.com

Maybe you know some students who are experimenting with smoking. Maybe you know a friend or loved one who is  hooked. Maybe it's you. This site is for those people. Share it with your students. Maybe you'll convince one to quit, and wouldn't that be wonderful?
 
The Great American Smokeout is tomorrow, the 17th. Encourage the smokers you know to check out this page. And maybe you'll want to read this story to your class: http://whyquit.com/whyquit/joelcigfriend.html and ask them to guess who (or what) the friend is.
 
They say you'll always remember your aniversary (if you know what's good for you), your spouse's birthday (ditto), when a loved one passed away, and the day you quit smoking for good.
 
January 3, 1993 - the day *I* quit.

Tuesday, November 15, 2005

[TIPS] - How do educators use blogs and RSS? A Webquest

 
Wanna learn more about Blogs and RSS? (Besides coming to my training in November?) Check out this webquest entitled, "How Do Educators Use Blogs and RSS?

Sunday, November 13, 2005

[TIPS] - KPL - Kids Programming Language

 
This free program allows your bright elementary age students to learn some progrmaming in a safe, friendly environment. They can program their own games!!! I KNOW that you know a few kids who would just LOVE this. Check out the home page to see screenshots of the games this program is capable of making, then turn those bright (bored?) kids lose on it.
 
I'd LOVE to see some examples of their games, too. Please share them with me.

Friday, November 11, 2005

[TIPS] - SuprGlu

From the site:
---------------------
Do you already use services like del.icio.us, flickr, blogger, typepad, etc? SuprGlu is a new way to gather all your content from those sites. In a nutshell, SuprGlu:
         gathers your content from popular webservices and publishes them in one convenient place.
         presents your content with simple, great looking templates which you can customize.
         is FREE to use!
—-----------
Don't know what any of this stuff is? Come to the training on the 22nd at 4:00 - Blogs. There's a VERY COOL world out there that is way beyond just your basic web pages. Come out to find out about it.

Thursday, November 10, 2005

[TIPS] - learn to type - free

 http://www.senselang.com/

Want to learn to touch type or perhaps just to learn to type a bit faster? This site has many lessons to try, or you can paste in your own text and practice on that. Straight forward easy.
 
It's free. (and fun for all ages) 
 
:-)

Wednesday, November 09, 2005

[TIPS] - Fun Science Gallery (SAFE for all ages)

Here's a safe tip for today to replace the other one. :-(
 
 
What a cool place this is to find activities that you can do with your classes. Make your own paper, build a toy cable car, and... SO much more. If you teach science then stop in here for a look.

Tuesday, November 08, 2005

[TIPS] - playkidsgames.com

 
Games in Math, alphabet, vocabulary, memory, and geography. Even addition Pinball! My only concern is that there doesn't appear to be a way within the game to turn off the sound. You'll just have to mute your speakers.
 

Monday, November 07, 2005

[TIPS] - microscopy image library

 
from the site:
The microscopy Image Library of science photographs shows a diversity of science images taken with light microscopes (LM) and electron microscopes (transmission electron microscope - TEM; scanning electron microscope - SEM). Search the image library for microscopy images from the following categories: Algae, Arachnids, Bacteria, Crystals, Fungi & Slime Molds, Insects, Invertebrates, Medical, Miscellaneous, Plants, Protozoa, Vertebrates, and Viruses. Use a Virtual SEM to find out what it is like to load and zoom-in on specimens at increasing magnifications with a scanning electron microscope. Find out why the Most Wanted Bugs are on our list.
 
Thanks to Sharon C for sharing this one.

Friday, November 04, 2005

[TIPS] - Free assistive technology

Thanks to Kurt for sharing this one. Here's what he said....

This may be of interest to some of your readers, maybe not.
A FREE talking web browser for students with vision impairments... fun to see if your district or teacher web site is ADA or Section 504 compliant.

http://www-306.ibm.com/able/solution_offerings/hpr.html
<snip>IBM Home Page Reader brings the world of the Internet to users who are blind or have low vision. It is an award-winning, talking Web browser that uses the power of speech to aid users in exploring the World Wide Web.

Thursday, November 03, 2005

[TIPS] - Earth and Moon Viewer

http//www.fourmilab.ch/earthview/vplanet.html

Remember last year when I shared with you the nist site (http://www.nist.time.gov/ ) that showed the sun/dark lines on the planet and I encouraged you to folllow it weekly? Those of you who did (I *KNOW*) were glad you did, as it provided a great lesson for the kids.

This site is similar, but with a LOT more things to do. Don't want to wait until March to see the equinox? Enter the date into the field and see it now. LOTS more to do with the moon, as well.

Enjoy.

Wednesday, November 02, 2005

[TIPS] - IdeaGenerationMethods

From the site:

This website lists and explains every idea generation method I've encountered during the past 15 years. It is the result of extensive research; my many sources include books, management journals, websites, academics, consultants and colleagues.

The methods have been drawn not just from the worlds of creative problem solving and innovation, but also from other worlds such as organizational change, strategic planning, psychotherapy, the new sciences and the creative arts.

Tuesday, November 01, 2005

[TIPS] - Free paint program - Paint.Net

 
Paint.NET gives commercial photo editing programs some serious competition, which is all the more impressive since it began as a classroom project. This free program was developed by a team of computer science students at Washington State University, under a partnership with Microsoft.
 
Did I mention that it's free?